Craig Taylor (catnash) wrote in anaishikawa,
Craig Taylor
catnash
anaishikawa

Buddhist Symbols Needed

Can anyone help me?

I'm looking for either the Chinese or Japanese symbol for "The Middle Way" or "The Middle Path".

I have found that, in Chinese, the word is "chudan" and means "midsection" when used in karate training, however, I have yet to actually locate the specific character(s) which make up the symbols.

I have found symbols for "The Journey" and "The Way" but nothing identifies either of these as being significant of following the "middle" way we talk about in Buddhism.

If anyone has any advice, I would appreciate it. I've googled, yahooed, excited, lycosed, and dogpiled my fingers off trying to discover these symbols!

Namaste to all Buddhas and Bodhisattavas who are walking the path with me.

(cross-posted somewhat)
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Hi. I didn't find the "chudan" you're looking for (I was thinking Chinese and Japanese might have the word in common), it might be 中段 、but that 'chudan' in Japanese means the middle of a stairway or middle berth.

中心 - (chushin) means heart, center, balance
中 - middle
心 - heart

It might not be in the Buddhist sense or in the sense you're looking for, though. I'll keep looking.
仏道 - "Butsudou" was just listed as "Buddhism" in my dictionary under other kanji listings that just translated as Buddhism, also - but this one is more directly translated as "Buddha Way".

仏(butsu) - Buddha 'butsu'
道(dou/michi) - street or way

武士道 (busshido) is "Samurai way", which everyone knows... you can see the same kanji on the end.

Wu

Anonymous

February 17 2005, 04:27:33 UTC 12 years ago

I would look up the Chinese symbol 'Wu'
Zen buddhists have it easy. Pick up brush, fill with ink, and place to paper. Draw a circle. This means Zen, and Zen is the Absolute Middle Way.
the chinese word is zhong and is the same character for chu in japanese. 'zhong' simply means middle. Zhonglun is the name of the chinese translation of Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakarikas. The name of the Madhyamika tradition in China is called the Sanlun Zong, which means "three treatise tradition" and refers to Kumarajiva's translations of three central madyamika texts*.